Mosque of Shaykh LutfAllah in Isfahan - Beautiful IRAN
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1388,01,29 Time 01:34 ب.ظ

About Mosque of ShaykhLutf Allah in Isfahan province

(in IRAN)


 The Mosque of Shaykh Lutf Allah on the east side of Maydan-i-Imam (Naqsh-i-Jahan) is a pleasantly proportioned small sanctuary preceded by a shady square and a large pool It was built by Shah Abbas I between 1602 and 1619. It is named after scholar of Islam who was greatly venerated at the time.
A native of Lebanon, this Shaykh was invited by the king, first to Mashhad, near the sanctuary of the Imam Reza, then to the capital where he has put in charge of the king`s mosque and the school of theology.
The great originality of the cupola is due to the cream or ink according to the time of day-ground color to which the artist has added a very delicate decoration of serried arabesques and black and blue flowers. The turquoise and sapphire shades of classic Safavid art appear only on the drum and right at the top



The decoration of the entrance portal consists of vault with stalactite and blue and yellow mosaics, and anticipates that of the great ivans of the Imam`s Mosque. Here, however, the subjects are amazingly varied, as for instance on the panel showing two peacocks framing a flower vase filled with luxuriant branches.

This small mosque has no central inner courtyard; there is only a small prayer hall which is approached by a corridor. But it is a real gem in which the art of mural mosaics in Isfahan reached its peak. There is not a flaw in the quality of the materials. The balance and harmony of the colors.
The walls are entirely faced with sumptuous ornamental (carpets) of gilt geometrical designs on a splendid bluish-green background.
All round the large panels are stringcourses on which the Persian calligraphers have drawn elegant white lettering. The inscription in the mihrab gives the name of the architect: a poor and humble man, seeking God`s mercy, called Ustad Mohammed Reza, the son of Ustad Hussein, architect in Isfahan in 1028 (of the hegira). The mihrab itself is a model of its kind with its high niche and ceramic facings.
The entrance vestibule
The decoration of the entrance portal consists of vaults with stalactites and blue and yellow mosaics, and anticipates that of the great ivans of the Imam`s Mosque. Here, however, the subjects are amazingly varied, as for instance on the panel showing two peacocks framing a flower vase filled with luxuriant branches.
Polychrome tileworks
The Safavid period marks a high point of the polychromatic decoration of buildings, techniques being developed that enable the builders of Isfahan to cover almost every surface that could be seen with brightly colored glazeness.
Entrance to the Sanctuary
To enter the Mosque, one passes hrough a narrow, bending passageway whose darkness confers an aura of mystery that contrast perfectly with the sudden impact of the softly lit spaciousness of the chamber. The Safavid period marks a high point of the polychromatic decoration of buildings, techniques being developed that enable the builders of Isfahan to cover almost every surface that could be seen with brightly colored glazeness.
The Main Prayer Hall
This small mosque has no central inner courtyard; there is only a small prayer hall which is approached by a corridor. But it is a real gem in which the art of mural mosaics in Isfahan reached its peak. There is not a flaw in the quality of the materials. The balance and harmony of the colors. The walls are entirely faced with sumptuous ornamental (carpets) of gilt geometrical designs on a splendid bluish-green background. All round the large panels are stringcourses on which the Persian calligraphers have drawn elegant white lettering. The inscription in the mihrab gives the name of the architect: a poor and humble man, seeking God`s mercy, called Ustad Mohammed Reza, the son of UstadHussein, architect in Isfahan in 1028 (of the hegira). The mihrab itself is a model of its kind with its high niche and ceramic facings.
Dome of the Shaykh Lutf Allah Mosque
This exquisite building, more private oratory than public mosque, was erected by Shah Abbas I between 1603 and 1618 on the Royal Maydan (Maydan-i-Imam) facing the Ali Qapo Palace. It is named after the Shah`s father-in-law who was a respected divine. There are a number of unusual features about the building: its squat and partly unglazed dome; the absence of a central court and ivans; the single sunken sanctuary chamber covered from top to bottom in mosaic faience of the highest quality. The 42 ft. wide dome rests on a drum pierced by 16 small windows, through whose double grilles the light plays. The tilework of the ceiling is perhaps the most intricate in Isfahan and has the quality of a finely woven carpet. The building was extensively and skillfully restored between 1954 and 1956

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